Magisto is an award winning AI video editor. Add your photos, video, music and whatever else you want to include and it will automatically edit and create your video. And the results are pretty impressive. By choosing the type of story you want to tell, Magisto can save you lots of time by using its smart video editor to deliver your professional looking video. Great for quick Instagram posts. It makes it look like you spent at least a couple of hours editing your story.

Last but not least we come to FilmoraGo. FilmoraGo is a solid video editing app without any watermarks or paid subscriptions. Add music, transitions, and trim video clips all from within the app. You can easily add themes, text, and titles to your videos. There is a desktop version starting at $44.99 a year, but you can still get a lot of editing joy from the free mobile app.
Any of the above video editors will work great for budding YouTube editors, however, every one of them will also cost you a lot that is if you don’t go for the free version of Avid Media Composer. That being said, if you are just starting out, you should start with a software which is not only fairly cheap but is also easy to learn. The video editors mentioned in this section are cheap and easy to learn than those mentioned above. Again, if you want the best of the bunch, choose one from the above, however, I would suggest first you start with any of these and then upgrade yourself as get more comfortable with video editing.
Other measures of performance include startup time and simple stability. Again, video editing is a taxing activity for any computer, involving many components. In the past, video editing programs took longer than most other apps to start up, and unexpected shutdowns were unfortunately common, even in top apps from top developers such as Adobe and Apple. The stability situation has greatly improved, but the complexity of the process, which increases as more powerful effects are added, means crashes will likely never be fully eliminated, and they often raise their ugly heads after a program update, as I found with the latest version of Pinnacle Studio.

So, if you use this type of software on a daily basis, or just need something converted as quickly as possible, this is the program you want. It also has a full array of customization and enhancement tools. Not only can you trim away unwanted footage, but also adjust picture values like brightness, contrast and hue. You can also add effects, watermarks and a whole host of fun filters. Additionally, you can use this program to create a DVD, complete with menus, of your converted videos.


We combined a text opener with five clips linked by a cross-fade-type transition into a 2.5-minute video shot at 60 frames per second, and rendered the projects to the MPEG-4 format at 720p. We timed rendering at both 60 fps and 30 fps. We adjusted settings to take advantage of hardware acceleration for all tests whenever possible, setting them in either the preferences or the rendering controls for the best speeds. Apple’s iMovie, the lone Mac-only app, is not included in the timed comparisons.
When asked if he had any advice for newbie editors learning the software, he recommended third-party resources. “Classes are great if they’re available and affordable,” Dutcher said. He also advised new video editors to “buy the manuals that are not published by the software companies, such as 'Final Cut Pro for Dummies,' because they’re written by actual users, and written in language that’s more accessible.”
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